‘The king’s last words’ (2 Samuel 23:1-7)

There have been many occasions when the last words of people have been significant. That much is true for King David. In 2 Samuel 23:1-7, we have a record of David’s last words and they are words that carry much weight, not just because he was dying, but because they came to him from the Lord. Because that is so, these words of David take on a new perspective and point us beyond David to something greater in the plan of God that includes all of His people.

‘The king’s song of songs’ (2 Samuel 22:1-51)

It is well known that King David was a prolific song writer. 2 Samuel 22:1-51 is one of his compositions, pretty much identical to what is recorded in Psalm 18. We can read David’s song as a testimony to the strong and abiding grace of God toward him, but also as a forerunner and pointer to the grace of His greater Son, Jesus, who would come and show grace to the extreme, not just to David but to all His people.

‘The king’s battles and the King’s victory’ (2 Samuel 21:5-22)

There’s no question that 2 Samuel 21:15-22 is an unusual passage. It recounts the stories of 4 battles that David and his men found themselves in – all against formidable foes, some descended from the giants and some even with six fingers and toes on their hands and feet! The battles make intersting reading, but so do the lessons that ultimately flow from the text which once again points us to Jesus as our Mighty King who fought the ultimate battle and won!

‘The king’s promise and a mother’s pain’ (2 Samuel 21:1-14)

This part of God’s Word, 2 Samuel 21:1-14, would have to be one of the saddest parts of Scripture. Although it is not quite clear when this actual event occured (as these latter chapters of 2 Samuel seem not to be in chronological order), it still is instructive for us. While the king made good the  promise that brought an end to the nations’ drought, the price tag was very high as seven of the family of Saul were hanged. Rizpah’s grief and pain were all too real. Another mother knew that pain. Her name was Mary and her son was  Jesus!  He too was strung up, but not for his sins, but ours.

‘The king’s encounter with an out-and-out rebel’ (2 Samuel 20:1-26)

Following hot on the heels of the rebellion led by David’s son, Absalom, came the rebellion led by Sheba in 2 Samuel 20:1-26. Called a ‘worthless fellow’ in verse 1, Sheba’s rebellion also proved fruitless and only led to more bloodshed, including his own and that of Amasa’s, David’s chief. Thankfully, God in His mercy did not treat our rebellion against Him as a reason not to come in grace and save us, which He did by David’s Son, Jesus who never rebelled but paid the price of death for rebels like us.

‘Who is Jesus? Three opinions about Him’ (Rev Keith Bell, Matthew 16:13-23 and 17:1-9)

When Jesus gathered His twelve disciples to Himself at Caesarea Philippi in Matthew 16:13-23, He asked them two very important questions…who did the people say that He was and who did they think that He was? While they answered these questions well, God the Father also had something to add as revealed in Matthew 17:1-9. Of course, what God thinks about the question is more important than anyone else’s opinion! What do you think of Jesus?

‘Loving Jesus more’ (Luke 7:36-50)

Simon was puzzled by Jesus; who was he? Was he from God, a prophet even? So he invited him to eat with him – and Jesus accepted. In Luke 7:36-50, we find that during the meal at his home, a woman Simon knew to be a ‘sinner’ (prostitute) wet Jesus’ feet with her tears and wiped them with her hair and anointed them with perfumed ointment. But Jesus knew who she was, and that she had done this to him because she was a forgiven sinner; faith in Jesus had saved her; she had believed in him, and he had forgiven her, and she had done this to him because, having been forgiven much, she loved him much.

If Jesus has forgiven our sins, we cannot help loving him, and long to show our love for him, for we know our forgiveness cost him death on a cross; we know that the Son of God loved us and gave himself for us. If we love Jesus, we will know our love for him is not yet what it ought to be, and we will long to love him more, and we will nourish our love for him by meditating on his love for us, by the inward working of his Spirit, and by prayer. The proof of our love for him is not feelings, or tears, or costly gifts, but obeying him. Love for him will enable us to obey him and so prove our love, and our obedience with increase our love for him who died for us to save us from our sins.