‘The parable of the persistent widow’ (Luke 18:1-8)

This sermon on Luke 18:1-8 by guest preacher, Rev Peter Phillips, tackles some of the biggest questions in life. “Why is there injustice in the world? What is God doing about it? What should the response of God’s people be to injustice?” All these questions circle around us and pervade our society everyday and while it is easy to get waylaid by their pressing nature, this parable urges God’s people to prayer, patience and perseverance – all things that we need God’s help to do and do well!

Full service

00:00 Welcome
Song: Come Thou Almighty King
00:17 Introduction
00:40 Prayer
04:50 Bible reading: Psalm 10:1-18
Song: See Him Coming
07:09 Kids’ Talk
Song: Revelation 3:20
11:48 Bible reading: Luke 17:11-18:8
Song: By Faith We See the Hand of God
15:56 Sermon: Luke 18:1-8
Song: Be Still My Soul
45:00 Closing

‘The Graciousness of God’s Grace’ (Luke 17:1-10)

On what basis are we accepted before God? In Luke 17:1-10, Jesus says his followers are unworthy servants. God owes us nothing and we owe him everything because he has accepted us by grace through faith alone. Hearing him, the disciples ask Jesus to increase their faith but they – and we – don’t need more faith so much as true faith. Having been forgiven, we forgive others – not to impress anyone but merely having “done what was our duty” (v10).

‘Using worldly wealth wisely’ (Luke 16:1-18)

In Luke 16, Jesus tells another parable where an unjust steward—or dishonest manager—wasted his master’s possessions. This reminds us of the parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32) where in the far county he wasted his inheritance in reckless living. Yet here the steward is commended as wise since “the sons of this world are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than the sons of light”. Our Lord would have us be exceptions to the rule by using our wealth wisely and making friends for ourselves by mean of unrighteous wealth, so that they may receive us into the eternal dwellings. Heaven cannot be bought – but we can invest for eternity.

‘Welcomed into God’s Kingdom’ (Luke 14:15-24)

God spreads a banquet for all peoples yet the self-righteous are unwilling to enter the kingdom. They give weak excuses to justify their unbelief and despised the sinners who came readily. Sinners who know they need a saviour enter the kingdom instead of those who rejected the invitation. Jesus tells a parable in Luke 14:15-24 that shows our need – are we willing to accept the invitation and welcome others into God’s kingdom?

‘The parable of the barren fig tree’ (Luke 13:6-9, Peter Phillips)

The parable of the barren fig tree in Luke 13:6-9 belongs to Jesus’ words at the end of Luke 12 and his response to the people who told him of the death of certain Galileans killed by Pilate’s soldiers, and continues theme of our urgent need to make our peace with God. The people of his time could interpret the signs of changing weather, but not ‘the present time’ in which showed He was their Messiah and King. Despite this, and using the news of the day, Jesus persisted in calling people everywhere and immediately to repentance.

‘Abram: Background steps’ (Genesis 11:27-32)

One of the most important characters in the Bible also played a major part in the unfolding of God’s plan of salvation. His name was Abraham, first introduced to us in Genesis 11:27-32 as Abram. His family background plays an important part in his story as does the fact that his wife Sarai, was barren…and who was it that Abram worshipped before God called him? All these matters underline the amazing grace of God that saves those who by rights, do not belong.