‘The Graciousness of God’s Grace’ (Luke 17:1-10)

On what basis are we accepted before God? In Luke 17:1-10, Jesus says his followers are unworthy servants. God owes us nothing and we owe him everything because he has accepted us by grace through faith alone. Hearing him, the disciples ask Jesus to increase their faith but they – and we – don’t need more faith so much as true faith. Having been forgiven, we forgive others – not to impress anyone but merely having “done what was our duty” (v10).

‘Prayer: Through the Son’ (Mark 14:32-42, 1 John 1:5-2:2)

Prayer is something that should be fundamental to every Christian, yet we often neglect prayer while also taking prayer for granted (1 John 1:5-2:2). In this message, Ryan Smith reminds us again of the amazing provision that enables us, sinners, to come before a holy and righteous God, with confidence, and call on him as our Father (Mark 14:32-42). The good news transforms our understanding of prayer!

‘Meet the ‘more excellent way’ for the church at Corinth'(1 Corinthians 13:1-13)

There’s something about love that means that thousands of songs are written about it and everyone seems to want it! In 1 Corinthians 13:1-13, the Apostle Paul speaks about love quite extensively in a well-known text that has been used at many a wedding, but what he has to say really applies in the first instance to the church at Corinth, who had forgotten that the grace of love is better than any spiritual gift. And what he wrote was really for the church to put into practise – in loving each other – and loving in the way that Jesus loved the church, by laying down His life for her. Ultimately, our lack of love or lovelessness, is because we have moved far away from the cross – where we learn what love really is.

Full service

00:00 Welcome
Song: 10,000 Reasons
00:14 Introduction
00:36 Prayer
05:35 Bible reading: Ephesians 4:17-5:2
Song: Behold our God
08:18 Mission Spot
Song: Jerusalem
11:46 Bible reading: 1 Corinthians 13:1-13
13:55 Sermon: 1 Corinthians 13:1-13
Song: When I Survey
34:57 Closing

‘Understanding covenant baptism’ (Acts 2:39)

The Christian Church has been long divided over whether or not the children of Christians should receive the sacrament of baptism or not. As a Presbyterian Church we believe they should, and that the covenant promises of God to Abraham still stand. While this is an important aspect of what we believe, it is still not the gospel and not worth breaking faith over. Even so, God’s promise of salvation is to ‘you and your children’ (Acts 2:39)

Full service

00:00 Welcome
Song: Come People of the Risen King
00:14 Introduction
00:40 Prayer
05:28 Bible reading: Genesis 17:1-26
10:20 Mission Spot
Song: He Will Hold Me Fast
13:34 Bible reading: Acts 2:14-41
Song: O Lord my Rock
18:17 Sermon: Understanding covenant baptism (Acts 2)
Song: Marvellous Grace
41:27 Closing

‘Journeying on to the city of the great King’ (Psalms 132, 133, 134)

Psalms 132,133 and 134 are three psalms that are linked by a common theme of being part of the ‘songs of ascent’ that were sung by the people of Israel going up to Jerusalem. Psalm 132 highlights that the city of Jerusalem was the city where God’s King lived. Psalm 133 celebrates the unity of the people of God in that city, and Psalm 134’s focus is upon the worship of God’s Name that happened there by day and night. Heaven will be all this and more for God’s people upon a ‘pilgrim journey’ to that heavenly city. (First preached March 2013)

Open Sunday 21 February

Bendigo Presbyterian will be meeting in person this week, 21 February. Our radio service podcast will also continue on 105.1 Life FM from 9.30am. Please continue to pray for those who are sick, vulnerable and our medical workers and leaders, and the roll out of vaccines, asking that the virus will continue to be contained.

‘Using worldly wealth wisely’ (Luke 16:1-18)

In Luke 16, Jesus tells another parable where an unjust steward—or dishonest manager—wasted his master’s possessions. This reminds us of the parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32) where in the far county he wasted his inheritance in reckless living. Yet here the steward is commended as wise since “the sons of this world are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than the sons of light”. Our Lord would have us be exceptions to the rule by using our wealth wisely and making friends for ourselves by mean of unrighteous wealth, so that they may receive us into the eternal dwellings. Heaven cannot be bought – but we can invest for eternity.

‘New Year, New Heavens, New Earth’ (2 Peter 3:1-13)

Is that all there is? For the Christian there is more and a great hope. While we wait, how is our focus? Fixed on the distance or stuck on foreground? In 2 Peter 3:1-13, Peter warns that there will be scoffers, just as always. Are we waiting like Joshua and Caleb (Numbers 13) or like the other ten?

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death.
Out, out, brief candle!
Life is but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury
Signifying nothing.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth (Act 5, Scene 5)