‘The king-elect who made it to the throne (well, almost)! (2 Samuel 2:1-11)

After the death of Saul, 2 Samuel 1:1-11 tells us that David was crowned King of Judah. Judah and not yet all Israel. After years on the run from Saul and with the promise of God in his mind that he would one day become King of the whole nation, how David responded to this next step is informative. Was he going to be a King who would take control of the nation by force or was he going to be a King who relied upon God to establish him? And what of the rival king, Ish-bosheth, son of Saul? Again, how David responded would be crucial!

Yes, our stance on ‘same sex marriage’ is No

Later this week when the postal plebiscite papers reach our letter (and post office) boxes, we are all going to have the option of contributing our opinion on the proposed change to the Marriage Act 2004.

While some Christian leaders (even in Bendigo) have come out in support of the ‘Yes’ vote, we must respectfully disagree and put it out there that we cannot agree with the proposed change.

And why is that? You can find out our reasons here in a document prepared by the Presbyterian Church of Victoria’s ‘Church and Nation Committee’.  It’s not too long and it expresses right where we stand!

‘The King-elect’s lament over the death of the King’ (2 Samuel 1:1-27)

The book of 2 Samuel continues the story of 1 Samuel, where in chapter 31, King Saul met a grisly end by his own hand. 2 Samuel opens with the news of Saul’s death reaching King-elect David. It may be that the news-bearer presented the report on Saul’s death to David in the hope of some reward, but all it achieved was distress and grief to David and a swift execution for the news-bearer! Why such a response from David? And why such distress? And why such a poetic lament for Saul after all that Saul did for David? And what can we learn from David’s response to the news of Saul’s death?

‘Holiness 102: There’s a war going on!’

While the world knows the reality of the horror of war, the believer also knows the reality of the battle for holiness. Best laid plans and intentions can so easily be left aside. The Christian life is a paradox. We have been delivered from the penalty of sin, but not yet from the presence of sin. The desires of our own sinful natures and the Holy Spirit are often in conflict. How do we fight this battle? Every believer needs to know that indwelling sin is the problem, that it lives within our hearts, that it deceives our reasoning and ought not be allowed to have control. The key to victory is not found in ourselves but in the presence of God’s Holy Spirit who can and will assist us in this ongoing battle for holiness.

‘Holiness 101: So how do you measure up?’

Holiness. It’s often been misunderstood, even by God’s pople. What are we to make of it? For a start, holiness begins with God. He is ‘holy, holy, holy’. Holiness is his chief characteristic and everything about him (his love, his wisdom, his mercy etc.) is holy. Holiness is also defined by Jesus. As he was and is God, we should expect that everything he did was holy, and this was true. Though he hung around with ‘sinners’, his life was holy in every way. Then also, holiness is necessary for believers. It is needed to prove that we know salavtion. It is needed so that we can have fellowship with God. It is needed if we want to be useful to God. Holiness is a path to take, a battle to fight and a desire to be pursued. It begins with God but ought to be seen in his people who are called to be like him in this way.

‘Prayer: For Saints, Servants and Souls’ (Phil 1:9-11, Rom 15:30-33, Col 4:2-6)

Guest preacher, Rev Stuart Withers (Rochester Presbyterian), preached from three main texts in his message on the importance of prayer (Philippians 1:9-11, Romans 15:30-33 and Colossians 4:2-6.). Just as Paul exhorted us to make ‘all kinds of prayers for all the saints’ (Ephesians 6:18), so also in these texts we are reminded that prayer is the key for the encouragement of God’s people, the strengthening of His gospel workers and the means by which unbelievers are brought into the Kingdom of God. Great things happen when God’s people pray!

‘Timothy! Here’s what to teach the rich in the light of eternity!’ (1 Timothy 6:17-21)

In the final section of Paul’s letter to Timothy, the Apostle reminded this young pastor of one of the major snares that would entrap the believers at Ephesus – riches. Although it is no sin to be wealthy, those who do enjoy riches face the temptation to give their hearts to their wealth or their material possessions and in so doing, fail to make use of their wealth for God’s glory. Paul therefore instructed Timothy in 1 Timothy 6:17-21 to teach the wealthy at Ephesus to beware of the uncertainty of riches, to be generous with their wealth and to see their wealth in the light of eternity, knowing that everything belonging to this world will be destroyed at the end of the age. It is possible to be godly and wealthy, but to do that God must always come before wealth. To do otherwise is to fail to be faithful stewards of all that God has given His people to enjoy.

‘Timothy! Here’s some commands for your own benefit!’ (1 Timothy 6:11-16)

The first part of Paul’s concluding statements to Timothy in 1 Timothy 6:11-16 address Timothy directly.  the whole letter was written for his benefit, this section would leave Timothy in no doubt as to how he should go about the task that was a ahead of him. The section of text centres around 5 commands that Timothy ought to put into practice and all these commands are reminscent of language that might be employed by a senior army officer to a junior. The commands are ‘flee’ (sin), ‘pursue’ (godliness), ‘take hold’ (of eternal life), ‘fight’ (the good fight) and ‘keep’ (the commandment). Paul also called upon two witnesses, the Lord Jesus and God the Father, in  making this solemn and urgent charge to Timothy. God’s people may feel as though the fight is wearying and hard, but we are not to ‘lay down arms’ until death or until Jesus returns.

‘Timothy! Here’s some dangers that could snare the whole flock!’ (1 Timothy 6:3-10)

Life is full of dangers. Believers face dangers too. In 1 Timothy 6:3-10, Paul wrote to Timothy concerning very real dangers at Ephesus. To make that clear, Paul reminded Timothy first of all of the root and fruit of sound doctrine. The gospel was not invented by the apostles but came to them direct from Jesus. The aim of such teaching is godliness, a life transformed by grace. Paul also wrote of the root and fruit of false teachers. Not all who profess to follow Jesus adhere to his truth and false teachers often have false motives and the reult of these motives will become clear in their divisive behaviour. Paul also spoke of the root and fruit of the desire for material wealth. It is the love of money that can become a root of all kinds of evil. Jesus said ‘where your treasure is there your heart will be also’. God’s people need to guard their hearts against the dangers of false teaching and the more subtle danger of the love of money.

 

Euthanasia in Victoria?

Please join us as we pray that the intent of the Victorian Labour Government to legalize euthanasia in this state will be thwarted. By all accounts, the matter will be brought before State Parliament in August.

Apart from prayer, one thing you can do is sign a petition from Australian Christian Lobby calling for a plebsicite on this issue. You can find the petition here.

The Presbyterian Church of Victoria has expressed its opposition for the following reasons:

• Accepting euthanasia – by definition – suggests that some lives are worth less than others (at the moment it is the sick and aged in view, but it wouldn’t be too difficult to imagine it could be expanded to include the handicapped, even the depressed at a later stage).

• The State cannot guarantee that these laws will not lead to some cases of involuntary euthanasia (i.e there remains the inherent danger of the possibility of involuntary euthanasia).

• There is no way of properly regulating euthanasia (Holland is a great example of where this leads) and will undoubtedly lead to vulnerable people being placed under great pressure to acquiesce, and we have no doubt it would eventually become a means of aged health-care cost controlling decisions.

The matter is of course an emotive and complex one, but rather going down this dangerous path, we consider that a better solution can be found in the improved use of and the greater funding for palliative care.