‘Meeting Jesus’ (John 4:1-42)

Guest speaker Len preaches from John 4:1-42. Jesus has an appointment to pass through Samaria, but the woman he meets needs that meeting. This passage about the Woman of Samaria is all about Jesus and his character – he did not see people as others did. How do we see people? Do we offer hope? Jesus asks the women for a drink from the well but offers her living water (compare with John 7). This living water is his Holy Spirit, that Jesus’ saving work at the cross might be applied to our lives. As the passage goes on, we learn more about who Jesus is. The woman – of low standing and bad reputation – realises that Jesus is the Christ, she has received forgiveness and forgets her task at the well to tell the whole town. Be sure that you have met Jesus. Like Jesus, be no respecter of persons (looking up or down on anyone). Drink deeply of that living water that you cannot help but speak of it!

‘Christmas in just 4…no, 5 words’ (John 1:14)

There have been a lot of words written and spoken about the central meaning of Christmas. The Apostle John, in his prologue to his gospel (John 1:1-18), hits the nail on the head in just 4 words from verse 14. These words are so deep and profound that we need to get our heads around them…and it will take 5 words for us to do just that!

‘Jesus the Bread of Life’ (John 6:22-71)

After Jesus had fed 5,000 in the desert, many followed him for another free feed. To this crowd, Jesus made the claim that he was ‘the bread of life’ and that he offered food that would really satisfy. By this claim, found in John 6:22-71, Jesus offered to those who would believe in and follow him, security, an eternal destiny and a true sense of identity. When crowds starting leaving Jesus because his words were hard to take, Peter said on behalf of his disciples that Jesus alone has ‘the words of eternal life’. We would be foolish not to follow him!

‘On the beach with Jesus and then to wherever He sends’ (John 21:1-25)

John 21 concerns the appearance of the risen Jesus to seven of his disciples while out fishing and then on the beach. When they disciples saw him from their boat while out fishing they saw him as a stranger. When Jesus enabled them to bring in a great catch of fish, they saw him as their Lord. When Jesus carefully and gently reinstated Peter, they saw him as their friend. When Jesus then commissioned them to ‘follow him’, he made it clear they should serve him as their Lord

‘The core of faith: seeing what can’t be seen’ (John 20:24-31)

When Jesus appeared to the disciples after the resurrection, Thomas had not been with them and refused to believe their testimony. However, when Jesus appeared to Thomas and proved that he was alive, Thomas’ doubts soon evaporated and he freely confessed his faith. John’s purpose in writing what he did about Jesus was for this very purpose; that we too may believe God’s testimony concerning His Son.

‘The Day that changed everything and everyone’ (John 20:1-23)

When the disciples of Jesus had all but given up hope, because they had seen Jesus die and be buried, God changed everything by raising Jesus from the dead. Their perception of death, their perspective of Jesus and their purpose in life were all radically altered – and all for the better! The same change can come to all who believe God’s testimony concerning His Son Jesus who conquered sin and death.

‘Jesus: crucified, dead and buried’ (John 19:17-42)

The facts of the cross are plainly recorded in all of the gospels, but John has his own special emphasis on the events that unfolded that first Good Friday when the worst that man could show met with the best that God could give. The end result was and is a story of amazing sacrifice in which Jesus completed all the Father had sent him to do – to secure the salvation of all of God’s people.

‘Jesus on trial before Pilate’ (John 18:28-19:16)

Pontius Pilate was a cruel and often uncaring Roman governor in Jerusalem who had plenty of opportunity to ask Jesus questions, but failed to do anything with the answers Jesus gave to him. In fact, Pilate had the greatest opportunity to know the truth but succumbed to the pressures placed upon him the Jewish religious authorities and the vengeful crowd. Even yet, his question, ‘what shall I do with this man called the Christ?’ is a question everyone must answer.